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Records of alimony should be retained for tax purposes

For Connecticut couples who have gone through a divorce, keeping records of alimony payments can help them if they are subsequently audited by the IRS or if one of the parties goes to court regarding an alleged lack of payment. They want to keep records for at least three years and possibly for even longer if they anticipate having to go back to court, which can happen if there is an attempt to modify alimony payment amounts or durations.

Some aspects of Connecticut alimony laws

Alimony is an amount of money that one party must pay to the other after a divorce. It is considered the continuing obligation of the party to support the former partner until the recipient gains financial stability or remarries. Alimony in Connecticut can be ordered by the court in a number of ways. It may be payments over time for a definite period, it may be a lump sum payment or it may be a permanent payment until the spouse dies or remarries.

How alimony agreements work in Connecticut

Alimony, also known as spousal support, is typically given by the spouse with a greater income to the spouse with a lesser income. This is designed to help the transition more smoothly into a life outside the marriage. In some cases, alimony is only temporary, presumably while the lesser-income spouse becomes more employable. In other cases, it may be deemed that the lesser-income spouse requires permanent alimony. All spousal support decisions are handled on a case by case basis.

Terrance Howard says his money goes to alimony and child support

Connecticut movie buffs have probably heard of Terrence Howard because his film credits include "Hustle & Flow," "Iron Man" and "The Butler," but Howard claims the movie business has not provided him with a lavish income because of a divorce settlement. The actor recently said he cannot pay spousal support for $325,000 to his second wife because a majority of his income goes to pay his support obligations to his first wife and their children.

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