Like most Connecticut married couples, you and your spouse have likely encountered challenges in your relationship at some point. Even newlyweds sometimes find they’re not getting along as well as they’d hoped. In fact, some couples argue on their honeymoons. It’s part of marriage to have ups and downs in a relationship. However, certain issues or problems may prove more difficult to resolve than others.

If you’ve determined that your relationship is no longer sustainable, you may be among those in Connecticut who file for divorce this year. While no two situations are exactly the same, you may find that you relate to other people’s experiences, even regarding the issues that led to your wanting a divorce. You may also find that talking to others who have gone through similar circumstances can help provide resources that help build a strong support network as you navigate life changes divorce often prompts.

Couples who divorce often cite these issues as factors

What determines whether a particular issue is resolvable in your marriage or causes you to decide to sever your marital ties? There isn’t a definite answer to this question because every marriage is unique and what spouses consider a minor bump in the road in one marriage may cause irreparable damage in another. The following list includes issues that Connecticut spouses often cite as causal factors in divorce:

  • Marriage necessitates full-time commitment from both spouses. If one partner feels the other person’s commitment to the relationship is lacking, it can cause serious marital problems.
  • Poor communication or conflict resolution skills are common issues that often play a part in a spouse’s decision to divorce. You might feel that if you and your spouse can’t even have a peaceful discussion or understand each other, it is unlikely you will spend the rest of your lives together.
  • Marriage requires sexual fidelity. Extra marital affairs often cause permanent, irreparable damage to spousal relationships.
  • If you or your spouse have a chronic health problem, you may have noticed that it causes stress in your marriage. Sadly, some relationships cannot withstand the pressure of dealing with a serious health problem on a daily basis.
  • Do you and your spouse often fight about money? Unresolved financial disagreements are common among many spouses who file for divorce.
  • Child-related issues may also be a factor in your decision to divorce. Whether your children are young or have grown and moved out on their own, past or present relationship challenges regarding your kids may be a key factor in your decision to sever your marital ties.

Several or none of these issues may apply to your particular situation. Regardless of what has prompted your decision to separate, it can be helpful to now that you’re not alone in your struggle and that there are support networks available, especially if you’re a parent of young children. Knowing where to seek support for family-related or legal issues regarding divorce can place you one step ahead as you cope with divorce and adapt to a new lifestyle.