Connecticut couples who want a stronger marriage might want to consider cutting back on their social media usage. A study conducted by researchers at Boston University and several other organizations found a correlation between higher social media use and lower marital quality. People who are thinking about divorce or going through a divorce might also want to cut back on social media postings.

It is better to turn to relatives, friends or a therapist to vent about the divorce instead of putting negative posts on social media. People should also avoid sharing details about the divorce negotiations or final agreement. Spouses who are divorcing amicably might want to make an agreement about when they will discuss the divorce online. If there are kids involved, parents may want to include guidelines in the divorce agreement about whether children’s photos or other information will be allowed on social media. Above all, people should keep in mind that any information they put online could be used against them in the divorce.

Once the divorce is over, there may still be value in avoiding discussing an ex-spouse online, particularly if the two still move in the same social and professional spheres. Furthermore, a parent may use the ex’s social media posts to request alterations in the child custody arrangement or support.

An example might be if social media posts make it appear a though a parent has more money than they claimed during discussions over child support. If necessary, an attorney could help a parent pursue a child support modification in court.