The Law Offices of James A. Cuddy, LLC
Menu Contact
Call To Find Your Way Forward
203-583-8256
Direct, Honest And Fair Family Law Solutions
View Our Practice Areas

Posts tagged "spousal support"

Records of alimony should be retained for tax purposes

For Connecticut couples who have gone through a divorce, keeping records of alimony payments can help them if they are subsequently audited by the IRS or if one of the parties goes to court regarding an alleged lack of payment. They want to keep records for at least three years and possibly for even longer if they anticipate having to go back to court, which can happen if there is an attempt to modify alimony payment amounts or durations.

Modifying alimony orders in Connecticut

There are certain situations that may arise after an alimony order has been in place for some time that necessitate a modification. In the event that a substantial change in circumstances has occurred since the original order, a Connecticut family court may suspend, reduce, modify or terminate alimony as it sees fit.

Divorce mediation could save time and money

Couples from Connecticut who are going through a divorce might not be familiar about the goals of divorce mediation. This can be either voluntary or mandated by the court. Typically, the goal of the process is to create a divorce agreement that is acceptable by both parties, avoid unnecessary expense and emotional distress that typically accompanies litigation and lessen the chances of there being any hostility between the former couple.

Determination of alimony after divorce

As residents of Connecticut who are contemplating divorce may know, some former spouses may receive alimony that is either awarded by the court or agreed to by the spouses. The reason for alimony is to allow the lower-earning spouse or one who has not been employed during the marriage to maintain his or her standard of living and improve job skills so they may become self-supporting.

How alimony agreements work in Connecticut

Alimony, also known as spousal support, is typically given by the spouse with a greater income to the spouse with a lesser income. This is designed to help the transition more smoothly into a life outside the marriage. In some cases, alimony is only temporary, presumably while the lesser-income spouse becomes more employable. In other cases, it may be deemed that the lesser-income spouse requires permanent alimony. All spousal support decisions are handled on a case by case basis.

Terrance Howard says his money goes to alimony and child support

Connecticut movie buffs have probably heard of Terrence Howard because his film credits include "Hustle & Flow," "Iron Man" and "The Butler," but Howard claims the movie business has not provided him with a lavish income because of a divorce settlement. The actor recently said he cannot pay spousal support for $325,000 to his second wife because a majority of his income goes to pay his support obligations to his first wife and their children.

Cohabitation can impact spousal support payments

When Connecticut residents divorce, any spousal support that is awarded is generally a certain amount per month for a specified period of time. A change in circumstances of either party may provide grounds for reopening the issue, and cohabitation is one change in circumstance that could be used to reduce or terminate the original award.

Proving cohabitation in alimony cases

When a married couple files for divorce, a judge may order one of the parties to make monthly spousal support payments to the other party. Alimony payments will sometimes end after a set period of time, which may be determined by the length of a marriage. An ex-spouse's remarriage to another person will also terminate the spousal support obligation. In Connecticut, alimony payments may also be stopped when the recipient begins cohabitating with another person.

Collaborative divorce leads to healthy co-parenting

In most cases, a dad in a contested divorce dispute is told by family law mediators that he will lose a majority of child custody rights and property division rights to mom, and he will also be expected to pay a hefty child support each month. This can lead to a feeling of hopelessness for divorcing fathers, but fortunately there is a remedy on the rise. Collaborative divorce and co-parenting are both holistic approaches to uncontested divorce that are gaining recognition in the mediation system as an alternative the gender-based process.

Connecticut divorce: Men can request alimony too

When we think about alimony, most people think about a man paying support to his ex-wife. Since alimony has existed, the majority of recipients have been women. In the past this was so often the case because men tended out-earned their wives. Today, however, more than 35 percent of mothers who are married make more than their husbands, opening the door for men to request alimony.

Email Us For A Response

Take The First Step

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

The Law Offices of James A. Cuddy, LLC

525 Bridgeport Avenue
Suite 201
Shelton, CT 06484

Toll Free: 866-785-4409
Phone: 203-583-8256
Fax: 203-513-8673
Shelton Law Office Map